About The Instruments:

Paiste Planet & Symphonic Gongs:

SYMPHONIC GONGS

Our oldest version of the instrument, Symphonic Gongs have a slightly raised surface (without boss) with a harmonic and universal sound structure. The fundamental note of the gong is balanced with the instrument's complex overtones.

The characterizing word Symphonic thereby should not be misinterpreted as describing the literal sense of classical symphonic orchestra application but its original sense to unite harmonic sounds. The describing word universal shall be understood as “sound in its entirety”.

PLANET GONGS

Are tuned to the natural harmonic series based on the orbital properties of the Earth, Moon, Sun, and Planets. All of these gongs resonate in harmony with the celestial bodies and communicate a distinct aspect of the Music of the Spheres, which was first documented by Pythagoras in the 6th Century BC. Each planet gong contributes a vital pitch to the total harmonic resonance of our solar system.

Creating a Gong is a dedication to the deeper meaning of the structured, focused vibrations which unfold into sound upon playing the Gong and thus have an effect on human beings. Not only do you hear the Gong sound but you also feel its vibrations on and inside your body. The resulting feelings reach into the depths of your psyche. When you add the visual aspect, the trembling shape of the Gong, and the physical contact to the Gong by the mallet or the bare hand, dimensions of impressions ensue which can be experienced by anyone. These impressions can be discovered and experienced ever anew by composers and musicians and then to the listener; and they communicated to the individual who interacts with Gongs personally.Taken From Paiste Website.

Crystal Bowls:

The bowls are made of 99.992% crushed quartz crystal that is heated to 4000 degrees in a centrifugal mold. The thickness of the bowl determines the note, digitally tuned to C D E F G A and B corresponding to the chakras, our energy centers; root (C), sacral (D), solar plexus (E), heart (F), throat (G), third eye (A), and crown (B). The diameter of the bowl determines the pitch, ranging from 6 inches to 22 inches.

The archetype of the instrument may be seen in a harp, carried horizontally and struck with two sticks, found in iconographical documents of the ancient Babylonian (1600-911 BCE) and neo-Assyrian (911-612 BCE) eras.

Santoor:

Persian santoor consists of a trapeziform case made of walnut wood, approximately 90 cm wide at the broad end, 36 cm wide at the narrow end and 6 cm deep. The strings are fixed to hitch-pins along the left-hand side and wound round metal wrest-pins on the right by means of which they are tuned with a tuning-key (Tuning Wrench). Each quadruple set of strings rests on a movable bridge of hardwood (kharak). The bridges are placed so that the strings are divided into three sections, giving the fundamental note and two higher octaves.

There are nine (or sometimes 10, 11 and 12) quadruple strings an either side so that, with 18 groups of strings, 27 different notes can be played. The bass strings are of brass or copper and the trebles of steel.

Persian santoor is played by striking the strings with two light hammers (mezrab) held in three fingers of each hand. The ends of the sticks are usually covered with cloth to soften their impact on the strings.

 

 

 

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